Why American Idol is Evil

So, the following is an old rant of mine entilted, “Why American Idol is Evil” that I posted on my (and a few other KLAYMERS’) old blog, Wakefield Etudiant about three years ago. I wrote it in a notebook in a matter of 5-10 minutes whilst listening to The Replacements’ Stink EP. Then a few months later, I came across it and posted the basterd. Much to my amusement it received various comments, mostly hateful! lol After that it was posted on a forum or two and garnered even more (negative) comments. People seemed to take it way too seriously. I found it hilarious that readers actually thought I invested time and energy into making some sorta “journalistic endeavour,” when it really was just a written translation of my views on the show and the music industry with some exaggerations and strong language. Looking back at it now, I realize this rant is not my best piece of writing, but it sure is one of my favorites; after all it’s always a delight to piss people off. If I had written this piece today it would probably be different, but at the same time the general position is the same. Ok, so here’s the damn thang:

Music or art for that matter always meant to me, playing from your fucking heart, with no regard for who you offend. Some corporate bithces like to destroy this legacy and sell out for more money and more pussy. Fucke em’ I say. When I see Alice Cooper doing Staples commercials, I shake my head in disapproval, screaming to myself, “What happened to the ‘Parent’s Worst Nightmare,’ what happened to the snakes, the gory, torn apart chickens, ‘No More Mr. Nice Guy,’ and ‘School’s Out For Summer.” Well, I hate to break it you Mr. Cooper, you (and countless others) are “nice guys” and are the parents’ perfect image.
Seriously, it’s like the fucking 80’s again where your parents like the same music you do. Where’s the rebellion? Fuck, the entire nature of Rock and Roll is gone. I mean, don’t get me wrong it’s been dead for a while. Disco took a huge toll on us, MTV melted our brains with intellectually dilute, unimaginative, videos (still does, but videos are even dumber, less creative, and worst of all safer) and of course the 21st Century has brought us the greatest, most unholy, derelict, stain on the music world, none other than… American Idol.
I don’t know where to begin with this fucking show! It is evil, morally incorrect, and worst of all: sugar coated bullshit, fresh fo children of all ages! “Warning! if you like to use your brain or think for yourself and would rather listen to true fucking rebels, please turn your televison off right now. Thank you and may God bless your soul!” This caveat should appear in big fucking bold letters before they air AI (acutally most TV shows for that matter) on Fox and bring their filthy, government approved, pussy, garbage into millions of American Homes.
People always say to me, “come on now Chris, AI isn’t that bad, it gives countless, young , aspiring artists a chance to make it in the big time and millions of people can witness them do what they love on national television…” Fuck that! it assists countless young singers (who are doing the same fucking shit we’ve seen for the past few decades) become even bigger corporate, little bitches; slaves to a machine, that they are sadly oblivious to. When these faggots hop around and do their stupid fucking dances I just want to strangle each and every last one of them.
If Rock meant rebellion, rebelling to “the man,” then AI contestants are sucking the man’s cock and letting his pearly black cum posion millions across the nation, whenever they open their mouths. All artists, whether they are singers or whatever must do it themselves and do what they feel like doing, not what three, dickhead, judges want them to do. I mean can you picture an AI in 1967. Lou Reed sings “Heroin,” I bet Paula would say, “Lou that’s not exactly a safe song.” Or Hendrix out of his mind on acid setting his instrument ablaze. The fat, black guy (shit, what’s his name?), oh yeah, Randy, can you imagine him telling Jimi to put out the fire, cause it may turn off some of our viewers. Now, of course that would have never occurred because those artists had balls. It seriously makes my blodd curdle when I hear that young kids yearn to be big stars on AI. It’s the fucking kiss of death! There’s nothing dangerous or controversial about it and it is a major sign of how we have lost our momentum, ultimately becoming complacent zombies, eager to chow down on the next, fresch crap they have to serve us. Bullshit! Never do we have to accept crap, just because it is popular or because all of our friends adore it. Do a little searching, broaden your horizons and you will discover numerous classic and contemporary artists that always play from their fucking hearts. The music/art I get the biggest hard-ons for, offer me insight and best of all, allow me to think for myself. If you or a loved one enjoy watching AI or even worse want to be on AI (yikes!) please seek help! You are already a sell out, you sold out to yourself.

Box Set Review: Bill Hicks The Essential Collection

Full Title: Bill Hicks: The Essential Collection
Year: 2010
What’s On It?: “Ryko is proud to announce the release of The Essential Collection, a four disc set (2 CD/2 DVD) that encompasses Bill Hicks’ short but influential career as a satirist, social critic and stand-up comedian. The package contains double DVD discs with over five hours of footage from Bill Hicks’ personal archives including rare, never-before-seen performances from the early 80’s, the cult short film Ninja Bachelor Party (starring Bill Hicks, Kevin Booth and David Johndrow), in-depth interviews with Hicks and a photo gallery from his family’s keepsakes. The 2 CD discs offer over two hours of his best stand-up material with never-before-released performance pieces from a San Ramon , CA show recorded by Bill Hicks that was found in his archives. The box set also features new liner notes written by family members as well as renowned figures (including Henry Rollins, Eric Bogosian, noted UK author Paul Outhwaite, and UK journalist/tv personality, Clive Anderson), and a download card containing original song recordings by Hicks (that were mastered at Abbey Road Studios – London, England) entitled, Lo-Fi Troubadour.”- http://www.billhicks.com/essentialcollection.html

Comments: I am a die hard Bill Hicks fan (if you visit the site frequently, you should know that- hence the “Hicks Vid of The Day” posts), so when I heard about this box set I knew I had to have it. First, I threw in the CDs only to be somewhat dissapointed that I knew all the material. Hicks fans should be warned (though it was advertised) that the CDs on here are essentially the same as those found on Rant In E-Minor, Dangerous, and other Hicks albums. I had the impression that this would be new material and already owning all of Hicks’ recordings pretty much made nearly half of this box set obsolete. With that being said, considering this is an Essential Collection, it should have his best material. So, I guess I can’t complain. Now, the DVDs are another story. With a few exceptions, I had never seen any of the live performances they offer us here. They truly are rare, never before seen shows. Mostly we see early Hicks, all the way back to his teen years (or close to it) mocking his parents, teachers, and the drinkers of the world. Then just a couple of years later he, himself is pounding them back and discussing his experiences with cocaine and acid; I’ve never seen Hicks talk about doing blow before and being a Hicksian scholar, I knew he did plenty of it, but this just goes to show you how obscure and old some of these performances are. With some exceptions out there, before this collection was released you would be hard pressed to find footage of entire performances of Hicks from 81-88 (the wild, drunken, drugged out Hicks era). Though, on this DVD, his sets are all comedy and there’s no hullabaloo a la audience members heckling “YOU SUCK!” and Hicks retaliating with verbal rape. His routines range from school/home life to his earliest forays into the realm of politics/society, jokes about the military and government, amongst other topics. Some of the material you have seen/heard before, but there is plenty on the plate I guarantee you have not. Besides performances, the interviews are fun to watch as well as the epic kun-fu classic, Ninja Bachelor Party, which I was already a big fan of. If you’re into Hicks, I recommend this and if you have never heard of him or are not that familiar with his work, then this is a good place to start.

In the spirit of Bill

Grade: 8/10

Funny Hunx Interview!

“It tastes like Gatorade.” Haha, probably why I hate Gatorade. I agree with Seth “Hunx” Bogart here for the most part, he has a good grasp on his image. Personally, I’m like 90% about the music and the remaining 10% comprises of all the other zany things that make Hunx and His Punx who they are including their dress/appearance and attitude, which are just offshoots of the music. I don’t really care if people dress up or not in general, but if H & H P didn’t it probably would be dissapointing to some degree, kinda akin to Nobunny without bunny masks, ears, etc.

Quote of the Day: MLK On War


”I knew that I could never again raise my voice against the violence of the oppressed in the ghettos without having first spoken clearly to the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today — my own government. For the sake of those boys, for the sake of this government, for the sake of hundreds of thousands trembling under our violence, I cannot be silent,” Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Film Review: Trash Humpers

Full Title: Trash Humpers
Director: Harmony Korine
Year: 2009
Comments: Humping. Shagging. Forincating. Fucking. Whatever you wish to call it; it is a perpetual aspect of our American lifestyle. Trash: our ubiquitous used condom, the leftover, the thrown away, the skeleton of us. What happens when these two social phenomenas meet? The latest work of director, Harmful Korine. Being a massive fan of Korine’s first motion picture, Gummo (1997) I greatly anticipated seeing this film, in fact this was arguably the highest anticpated film for me in ages and certainly of this year. Having missed out on the various screenings of Trash from the past two years I put forth a valiant effort to order it from Amazon (it has been banned from Netflix!) and after a lengthy process it finally arrived. Quietly, I locked myself in my room and zoned out for a good hour and half (or whatever the running time is). As viewers we are presented with an “artifact,” as Korine has called it, this found footage, old school, raw, analog, VHS looking piece of work. And yes, right from the beginning, we watch thee miscreants hump trash like there’s no tomorrow. With no real dialogue or explanation we see non-linear scene after scene of the trio’s pastime, which include, but are certainly not limited to partying, setting off firecrackers, coercing their “slaves” to eat certain things and entertain for them, and of course murder. Of course. As can be expected with old Harmful’s cinematic experimentations, convential movie standards are obliterated and when we get any sense of insight about who these people are what their story is, this insight is severed. The film is completely chaotic, but amidst this bedlam, real emotion is communicated. As wildy and wacky as Trash can be, Korine manages to connect with his audience and even feel for the savage stars on screen with a unique finesse, unmatched in the undeground or aboveground film circuit. I honestly don’t know what it is sometimes. I mean, don’t get me wrong, Korine is clearly talented, but I feel like in someone else’s hands, I would view this as, well nothing more than trash. But, instead he takes the lowest of the low and transforms this filth fest into a genuine artistic expression, albeit a harsh, relentless, visual and audio assault on the viewer. This is extreme, fringe cinema; out of all the found footage films I have seen, this one has struck me the hardest. It looks very real (though it is totally ficticious) and never lets up. Not once does it feel like a film… ehhh, one or two exceptions, but I don’t want to delve into those scenes in this review. I will say, I am hesitant to call it a masterpiece, just yet, but it is an original, challenging, piece of art that is easily one of the most thought provoking films I have ever seen. With comparison to other Korine films, let me say I don not enjoy this nearly as much as Gummo. I found that to be far more entertaining and I loved the way it swtiched things up constantly, with never a dull moment, even mixing the conventional with the unconventional. Now, I do prefer Trash over Mister Lonely (2007), Korine’s last film, which moved closer in the direction of a more mainstream/conventional film. Trash is akin to Harmful returning to his old form, so I’m glad about that. With that being said, at times I feel a bit bored, or like the film has run its course. This only happens a few times, but that’s enough to note. The film simply lacks the constant barrage of lurid images that Gummo contains. Don’t misconstrue me, it has a plethora of nasty, shocking, and definitely impressionable images, but not consistent enough for my taste. I feel like the film’s length could use a little truncating. But, it really doesn’t matter what I think, Korine made his film, the Great American Movie. If you are intrigued by the art of trash humping, I recommend it.

Grade: To slap a letter grade on this is kind of pointless, considering the criteria I usually require for films, by and large, cannot be applied here. So, I will judge it on an emotional level (and it certainly is filled with emotion- the last fifteen minutes is one of the most unsettling scenes/endings my eyes have ever witnessed). In the words of Anthony Fantano, I am going to give this a strong 7 to light 8, probably leaning more towards 8.

“I TOLD YOU I’D KILL IT!” For one of the KLYAMers, this is one of the best scenes in all of film. I agree it is great and it is definitely one of the funniest/most disturbing scenes in the the feature and perhaps of all time for that matter.

Chris’s Top Ten of Twenty Ten

10) Cum Stain– Cum Stain (Burger)
Cum Stain exemplifies what is fantastic about Punk: putting passion over musicianship and just fucking rocking out! These ditties are far from perfect but, such memorable tracks as “Bachelor’s Life,” “Broke My Dick,” and “Just a Kid” are the epitome of youthful exuberance. On a lyrical level I could totally relate to these guys; “Cum Stain,” the album closer is an unsavory anthem that is our generation’s “Touch Me I’m Sick.” It just speaks the truth about the relationship between men and women, at the end of the day “I’m just another cum stain on your floor!”
Grade: B

9) First Blood– Nobunny (Goner)
This is another fun rockin’ classic from one of the greatest showmen of modern times. With this record, Nobunny takes his Ramones esque bubblegummy sound to new levels. I wouldn’t go as far as calling the production “adventerous,” but it definitely sounds bigger, cleaner, and more mature. Even lyrically, there are some dark undertones slid underneath the jovial mayhem of the music. Tracks like “Breathe” showcase said transformation. Don’t get me wrong, this still is the same old fun loving, wacky, and entertaining Nobunny we have come to adore. “Live It Up” and “(Do the ) Fuck Yourself” are new classics amongst others. My favorite tune and arguably the bunnyman’s greatest offering is the final track “I was On (the Bozo Show): I really dig the simplicity of just acoustic guitar, drum, vocals. One of his most heartfelt songs (vocally and lyrically) and the inclusion of the circus noises perfectly parallels this. After all, Nobunny’s music/performance is akin to a wild, bizarre circus show.
Grade: B/B+

8) Everything In Between– No Age (Sub Pop)
Everybody’s favorite music duo, No Age is at it again, unleashing another Noise Pop induced adventure! Admittedly, this was a disapointment, at least compared to their previous efforts, but Nouns (2008) is hard to top, so I’ll lay off their case for now. With that being said, this LP has grown on me and I have come to realize there are several amazing numbers on this record. “Life Prowler” has become my favorite No Age opener and when I saw them live the experience was phenomenal. All in all, I would recommend this to NA fans and non fans alike, glad they continue to make relentless, noisy, Punk music for all of us. Definitely one of my favorite bands of all time and certainly one of the best of today.
Grade: B/B+

7) Memphis– Magic Kids (True Panther Sounds)
I have had the great pleasure of recently hearing this modern pop masterpiece. Memphis is sonicly within the Brian Wilson/Beach Boys/Pet Sounds realm and is just as uplifting if not more. These kiddies indeed create a magical experience from start to finish. It is seemingly impossible to not feel ecstatic after listening to Memphis. Top tracks for me include “Summer,” “Hey Boy,” (reminds me of a Summer Heights High song!) “Superball,”Cry With Me Baby,” “Phone,” “Candy,” and “Skateland.” Alas, this record/band will not get the recognition it deserves; it’s a gorgeous, ambitious and overall euphoric Pop album.
Grade: A-

6) $– Mark Sultan (Last Gang)
Mark Sultan follows up his In the Red classic The Sultanic Verses (2007) with $ his most adventerous album to date. The BBQ tosses various ingrediants into his Garage dish: intense/trippy as fuck psychedelia (“Icicles”), doo wop (“Ten of Hearts”), and Anthemic Punk (“Go Berserk” and “Misery’s Upon Us”), amongst other styles. Sultan’s vocals are better than ever, best exemplified on tracks such as “I Am the End” and the aforementioned “Ten of Hearts.” He maintains his careful recreation of early 60s Rock and Roll, but goes so far beyond that and has created his best solo work yet. $ reenforces Mark Sultan’s Status! as a unique and inventive figure in the musical landscape.
Grade: A-

5) Hippies– Harlem (Matador)
Someday soon you’ll be on fire and you’ll ask me for a glass of water, but I won’t hear you because I’ll be blasting this Garage classic! To be frank, this LP isn’t even a “great” album in the truest sense of the word, but rather a collection of great songs, sometimes marvelous songs. I really dig the immediate pop hooks, comparable to those of Jay Reatard and Hunx and His Punx, though not quite the same style of those acts. Harlem is all about fun and they certainly deliver here, via sloppy, but definitely listenable production. This thing is filled with “hits.” Highlights include, but are not limited to “Someday Soon,” “Friendly Ghost, “Be Your Baby,” “Gay Human Bones,” and “Poolside.” If you are a fan of catchy Garage/Punk Rock, check out Harlem; by far one of my current favorite bands.
Grade: A-

4) The Maine Coons– The Maine Coons (Spent Planet)
Who? Yeah, I bet most of y’all have no idea whom these cats are. Before last June, I was guilty of such ignorance as well, until I saw them open for Nobunny. Goodtimes. I loved them then, but I really appreciated this duo when I tossed on their licentious debut LP. MC have a knack for creating bizarre, savagely hilarious, and infinitely memorable tunes. The first five tracks on this ditty serve as one of the greatest line ups I have heard in a long time. All solid songs. Then after tha there’s some filler, but overall this record is a nice assault on the pollitcally correct, uptight squares of the world. This is slimy Punk Slime at its finest, not to be taken too seriously. What should be taken seriously is checking out their music to begin with. I am honestly surprised these fellas aren’t as big as they could be (big meaning on Goner or a similar label). Just listen to classics like “My Kinda Luv,” “I Am a Motherfucker,” “Hey Dickhead,” “Ghetto Queen,” and “Pull the Plug On Grandma.” You’ll get the picture… or be completely terrified. Either way, The Maine Coons have done their duty.
Grade: A-

3) Halcyon Digest– Deerhunter (4AD)
Let me just say there is a big fucking trench between how much I love 4-10 and 1-3. Don’t get me wrong the first seven records enumerated here are more than decent, but this top three is extremely special to me, if not already indicated by the augmentation of the photos. Okay, so Halcyon pushes forward Deerhunter’s incredible gift for experimental (and emotional) pop music further than anyone could imagine. Perhaps because I am a huge fan of said styel I believe this is their greatest effort, but I think it goes way beyond that. Not to sound trite, but on this record Deerhunter have captured a true “Rock” identity whilst still maintaining their peculiar, unique aesthetic. These songs feel like FM Radio staples, songs you would hear in the mainstream, yet in spite of this accessible sound they remain anything but. It still boggles my mind how this is not a much bigger release, not that it matters, I am content with Deerhunter being appreciated for the right reasons. In any case, this record has had an enormous emotional effect on me and I can imagine the same for most folks out there. When Bradford sings “Come on, little boy you don’t have to cry” in “Don’t Cry” it reminded me of Lennon’s line “It’s getting hard to be someone, but it all works out, it doesn’t matter much to me” from “Strawberry Fields Forever.” In both accounts the singers speak directly to their listeners and affirm us that we are all human. On a separate note, the flow here is spectacular, as I said before this album is filled with strong “hits,” but it never feels like a compilation or a greatest hits collection, instead we hear a complete idea/experience and that’s another key factor in what makes this record one of the best, if not the best of the year. Finally, let me point out, just so people do not misconstrue me, I am not insinuating that Deerhunter has found their sound or style or any sort of crap like that. This is similar to what Anthony Fantano of The Needle Drop said about Animal Collective when reviewing Merriweather Post Pavillion (2009): Deerhunter is not the kind of band that just “finds” their sound and sticks to it. That seems like an insult to a band that constantly evolves and ventures into new territories and I see the future as no different. So, check out Halcyon Digest and Deerhunter today, classics include: “Don’t Cry,” “Revival,” “Sailing,” “Memory Boy,” “Desire Lines,” “Basement Scene,” “Helicoptor,” and “He Would Have Laughed,” Yeah, practically the whole damn thing. On a side note to fellow KLYAMer, Andrew Bedsole, right here is an album that should appear on Rolling Stone’s top ten list.
Grade: A

2) Gay Singles– Hunx and His Punx (True Panther Sounds)
This is simply astounding Rock and Roll (of the early 60s Girl Group variety)- extremely fun and catchy. Nothing more. Nothing less. Just the highest of its form. Keep Rocking!
Grade: A

1) King of the Beach– Wavves (Fat Possum)
No, not Kings of Leon, you fools. We Want Fun! King of the Beach! Haha, nothing against KOL, but this record like those of the Black Lips, Jay Reatard, The King Khan & BBQ Show, etc. seriously criticize their peers via music. This record brings out so much joy and euphoria in me I can’t help but pitty anyone that’s not listening to it. I know I sound like an elitist douche bag right now, but I don’t think you realize just how happy this shit makes me! I liked Wavves a lot before this record, but I was really thrilled when Nathan teamed up with Stephen Pope and Billy Hayes (formerly of Jay Reatard’s touring band), hopped into a studio and the rest is history. The cleaner production admittedly ameliorated the sound of the band, but without a doubt the brilliant pop songwrting already existed and vigorously unleashed on this album. For me, I will always cherish this masterpiece and associate it with Summer Twenty Ten. I would go as far as to label this as the greatest Summer record of all time, okay maybe the Beach Boys have the lead on that one, but Wavves are not too far off. What I specifically adore about Wavves is the fact that they don’t reject the music they grew up with (Blink 182, Green Day, and much lesser respected Commercial bullshit of the 90s), they pack it up with them and still wear it just like an old shirt you have grown into, but don’t want to show off anymore. With Wavves that 90s mersh shit is still intact and very much part of their sound, albeit sunk beneath the loud, surfy psychedellic, Animal Collective influenced Noise Pop of Wavves. They just threw a bunch of styles into a blender and hit go! It works. I have to put this at number one, I listened to it multiple times a day, nearly everyday this Summer and still listen to it a few times a week, more or less, and it is amongst my top five favorite albums of all time. With a couple of exceptions, every songs on this record is in the 9/10 range. Here are my favorites: “Post Acid,” “Linus Spacehead,” “Take On the World,” “King of the Beach,” and “Super Soaker.”
Grade: A

Honorable Mention: Best Coast’s Crazy For You, another great Summer album, one that serves as a terrifc companion with King of the Beach and more importantly showcases heartfelt love ballads and the exceptional songwriting/singing of Bethany Cosentino. Can’t wait to see BC and Wavves at Paradise in a few months!

Overall, my favorites of Twenty Ten are all Pop oriented in one way or another, in fact this is a great list of diverse Pop music.

Mini Classic Film Reviews: Halloween…

Full Title: Halloween
Director: John Carpenter
Year: 1978
Comments: Halloween gave us the classic teen slasher flick. Sure, Texas Chainsaw and others came before this, but Halloween cemented the staple in cinema. Essentially if you drink, smoke, and fuck when you can you will perish at the hands of the killer, in this case the ruthless Micheal Myers. Sure, he may not speak… at all, but that’s precisely what makes the character/film chilling. Not to mention, John Carpenter’s eerie music, easily one of the finest/scariest themes of all time. This is a classic and essential for the Halloween season every year.

Grade: A

Full Title: Dazed and Confused
Director: Richard Linklater
Year: 1993
Comments: If you have read my previous list of ABSOLUTE Favorite Films, then you would know this is number two for this guy. Dazed is the kind of film that gets better each time you see it until you have seen it a gazillion times like me, but I still appreciate it nonetheless. I associate this film with time, joy, and one’s perception of how much you enjoy your stay on earth and how this perception alters overtime. True, this is a party/hangout flick, the best of it’s kind as one Quentin Tarantino would agree. But, there is so much more going on than that. The tone of this film may be light hearted and certainly euphoria inducing (always cheers me up and makes me ready to party hardy!), but if you look closely the characters themselves do not realize this or outright disagree with this. At one point, Pink pronounces “if I ever refer to these as the best days of my life, then remind me to kill myself.” Their attiude toward life seems to contrast the tone of the film itself. It’s as if the film is speaking to us, saying: these were the good old days when you had no responsibilities and your only worry was which party you were going to next. Top priorities? Getting Aerosmith tickets, when they were still cool. But the characters do not realize this and sadly we never do either in our own lives. We don’t appreciate the good times until their long gone. Perhaps even editing out the bad stuff! It’s funny when I first saw this flick I was ten, way too young to appreciate or understand the significance of the story or should I say the insignificance of the story. I often hear Dazed Detractors (poor souls) comment that the film has no point or purpose, that the movie simply ends. This is true, but that is the point exactly. Dazed perfectly captures a slice of teenage life and in most days, nothing out of the ordinary occurs. At age ten this simply went over my precious skull and while watching the first half of the film I actually thought it was supposed to be some sort of afternoon DARE TV special against drugs! A few years later (age 13) I saw it again and I loved it. I would say this is the best time to turn people on to this flick, just as they are finishing up Junior High and becoming Highschoolers, just like Mitch. This got me so excited for HS. Sadly, as much fun as I had, it was never as righetous as the activity presented in Dazed, is anybody’s? Now I am in college and not too far from “That’s what I love about this High School girls, I get older they stay the same age.”

Grade: A+

Full Title: Kids
Director: Larry Clark
Year: 1995
Comments: Much like Dazed, Kids focuses on one day in the lives of the youth of America, where drinking, smoking, and fucking seems to be their only concerns. Yet, while Dazed has an atmosphere of joy and let the good times roll, this film has anything but. Most likely the characters in Dazed will go on to lead fine lives as upstanding citizens, but these kids are doomed for failure, incarceration, and certainly death. Clark takes then teen Harmony Korine’s painfully accurate screenplay and gives it the adult perspective we see in the film. As with Dazed the tone of the film seems to contrast with the attitude of most of the characters. The main players (literally) are Telly (Leo Fitzpatrick) and Casper (Justin Pierce) and both are quite satisfied as total assholes that will take advantage of anyone they can, they see nothing wrong with this, yet the film never approves of their behavior nor does it totally condemn them either. Instead, the film simply speaks for itself. Lastly, for my money, Kids has some of the most natural dialogue ever written. Most folks believe it is improvised, but in fact it is nearly all scripted. The fact that it appears ad libbed only speaks to the brilliance of Korine’s script. After all, as Clark stated, Korine’s screenplay is “from the inside, from the point of view of the kids.”

Grade: A

Three classic youth oriented films.

KLYAMER Shuffle


So, I hit shuffle on my ipod and the rest is history…

“One Man Revolution”- The Nightwatchman (Tom Morello) (2007)- Badass!

“Menu?”- Bill Hicks (recorded in 91, released in 2002) Bill ponders why Taco Bell has a menu

“Be Quiet (and Drive Far Away)”- Deftones (1997)- One of their strongest songs

“Loretta’s Scars”- Pavement (1992)- S & E classic

“Street Fighting Man”- Rolling Stones (1968)- 60s Revolution!

“Orange Spider”- mewithoutYou (2006)- “Orange Spider, Orange Leaf”

“Dancin’ Fool”- Frank Zappa (1979)- Gotta love that bizarre Zappa!

“Ocean Man”- Ween (1997)- Classic Ween from their incredible Mollusk LP

“Aja”- Steely Dan (1977)- I don’t really like this song or that genre of music anymore, but for what it is worth they clearly demonstrate excellent musicianship.

“Take Your Clothes Off When You Dance”- Frank Zappa (1968)- Damn, more Zappa!

Let’s see some other KLYAMER Shuffles. Be honest!