Incredible Song of the Day

I remember Glen threw this ditty on a mix for me and after hearing it a couple of times it didn’t stand out at all. Then suddenly, it came up on my ipod shuffle and for the first time I truly listened to it. The tune hynoptized me and still does. I highly recommend anyone reading this to check out more of their material, I know I will. No wonder, they are one of J Mascis’ new favorites!

Chris

CD Review: Primary Colours

CDReview

Band: The Horrors
Label: XL Recordings
Release: April 21, 2009

1. “Mirror’s Image” – 9.5
2. “Three Decades” – 9.3
3. “Who Can Say” – 9.6
4. “Do You Remember” – 9.5
5. “New Ice Age” – 9.5
6. “Scarlet Fields” – 9.6
7. “I Only Think Of You” – 8.7
8. “I Can’t Control Myself” – 8.3
9.  “Primary Colours” – 9.0
10. “Sea Within A Sea” – 8.7

Comments:
This is just one of those albums that’s been sitting in the queue since approx. July waiting to be reviewed. In fact, this is a first-time listening review. Present on this album are very enticing elements of ’80s post-punk. For instance, I thought right away on Mirror’s Image “damnit, this could be a boring one,” but it turned out awesome. There’s no fucking around on Three Decades with the creepy factor turned way up. It’s strangely engaging as well. Who Can Say has a poppy synth that plays at certain points beneath layers of guitar effects. I have to give it up to this band for being at least partially deceiving. Their formula for success is basically combining really dark elements of shoe-gaze with retro upbeat post-punk. A lot of bands have tried out this formula, but The Horrors really seem to possess a “catchy-bility” element like none other; i.e the reverb/delay effect on Do You Remember and the heavy-metal yet noise-pop New Ice Age. Scarlet Fields maintains a scary effect, but has a Pixies-esque bass line that reconciles dark with light. I Only Think Of You had me mistaking Faris Badwan for Calvin Johnson. The title track has a soothing flow to it. The final track has an ambient dance vibe to it that sort of works. Overall, I like this piece of work.

Grade: 9.2